Exhibition Schedule

Current Exhibition

July 25 (Tue) - September 3 (Sun), 2017

Forms and Expressions of Prayer
— Introduction to Buddhist Art
* The museum is closed on Monday

Esoteric, Jōdo (Pure Land) or Zen-Buddhism has taken changing forms over the period of time and continues to gain deep religious piety until today. Feelings for prayer has brought about the creation of beautiful Buddhist paintings and sculptures, protected and passed down over generations. The mandala illustrating the grand world of esoteric Buddhism, paintings of yearned-for jōdo (Paradise) and terrifying judgment of Hell, paintings that depict ascetic patriarchs of zen tradition, as well as Edo period zen paintings will be displayed to trace the various aspects of Buddhist faith and solemnity.

Exhibitions

2017.4〜2018.3

April 15 (Sat) - June 4 (Sun), 2017Utensils of Cha no yu — The World of Japanese and Chinese Tastes

Cha no yu (tea ceremony), which was developed and perfected by Sen no Rikyu and other tea masters of the Momoyama period, entered into a new stage in the Edo period. Daimyō (warrior leader) tea masters began to lead a new direction of cha no yu, and toward the late Edo period, sencha, a new type of tea ceremony, gained popularity. Kyōyaki (Kyoto-made) and Kuniyaki(locally made) ceramics and the Hizen porcelain added color to the world of tea ceremony, as well as the karamono (items of Chinese origin) was treasured in the utensils of the daimyō. One can see the establishment of a distinctive esthetic of tea ceremony through the merging of Japanese and Chinese worlds. This show will introduce the development and beauty of the utensils cherished by the Edo period tea masters.

June 10 (Sat) - July 17 (Mon), 2017The Winds of Suiboku-ga — Hasegawa Tōhaku and Sesshū

Suiboku-ga (ink-brush painting) is an expression of painting introduced from China, with a potential of infinitely hidden possibilities. However, it was only during the Muromachi period that Japanese artists who had learned from the Chinese predecessors were able to attain their own art of expression. Sesshū was the first to study the real expression of ink and brush in Ming China. It was Tōhaku who elevated the expression of suiboku-ga to match the Japanese sensibility. This exhibition will feature masterpieces of Sesshū and Tōhaku, with fine examples from Chinese painting, to show the origin of their creative drive to bring about new trends by learning from the precepts of the Chinese masters.

July 25 (Tue) - September 3 (Sun), 2017Forms and Expressions of Prayer — Introduction to Buddhist Art

Esoteric, Jōdo (Pure Land) or Zen-Buddhism has taken changing forms over the period of time and continues to gain deep religious piety until today. Feelings for prayer has brought about the creation of beautiful Buddhist paintings and sculptures, protected and passed down over generations. The mandala illustrating the grand world of esoteric Buddhism, paintings of yearned-for jōdo (Paradise) and terrifying judgment of Hell, paintings that depict ascetic patriarchs of zen tradition, as well as Edo period zen paintings will be displayed to trace the various aspects of Buddhist faith and solemnity.

September 16 (Sat) - November 5 (Sun), 2017The Art of Edo Rimpa

The art of Rimpa was born in 17th century Kyoto and followed a splendid development. It is in the 19th century that Sakai Hōitsu (1761–1828), born as the second son of Sakai Utanokami, the lord of Himeji domain, moved to Edo, and his student Suzuki Kiitsu (1796–1858) added further refinement to its style. This marked the establishment of “Edo Rimpa.” This exhibition will explore the appeal of Edo Rimpa that took the essences of Rimpa of Kyoto which was supported by the aristocratic style, and at the same time transformed it to an updated Edo esthetic.

November 11 (Sat) - December 17 (Sun), 2017Styles of Calligraphy II — Succession and Originality of Beauty

It was after the studies of Chinese standards that the tradition of cherishing calligraphy as art was cultivated establishing a distinctive world in Japan. The intellectuals of each time period were well acquainted with “calligraphic writing” and maintained discipline and numerous rules, but they also competed for skill on the other hand. Such custom is still present today, bringing about many styles. This show will try to seek how calligraphy was succeeded since the old days and how people sought for originality and ideal. We will also consider the manners of how calligraphy can be appreciate with masterpieces from Chinese and Japanese calligraphy.

January 12 (Fri) - March 25 (Sun), 2018Iro-e — Japan CUTE !

Iro-e, ceramics with polychrome overglaze enamels, flourished as colorful ceramics during the Edo period. It is represented by porcelain such as Kokutani, Kakiemon and Nabeshima, as well as by the ceramics ofKyōyaki ceramicists, Nonomura Ninsei and Ogata Kenzan. The fashion-conscious Kokutani ware arranged designs of kosode. The design-oriented Kakiemon won world popularity especially attracting the western royalty and nobility. The subtle feelings of the seasons characterized the Nabeshima ware and it was presented as gifts to the shōgun (supreme warrior leader). The kawaii cuteness and literary characteristics decoratedKyōyaki. All are distinguishing features of the multi-faceted Japanese culture reflected in the gorgeous world of iro-e.

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