Exhibition Schedule

Current Exhibition

Admiration for Sengai

January 12 (Sat) – March 24 (Sun), 2019

Sometsuke
– The Flowering World of Blue and White Ceramics
*The museum is closed on Monday except January 14, February 11, 2019.

Sometsuke or blue and white ware are ceramics on which underglaze designs are applied in blue, on white background. Together with the charm of the pure blue color, there is also a functional advantage in these ceramics where painting beneath the glaze makes it difficult for the design to come off. Having both top qualities of beauty and utility, sometsuke developed widely in many areas of the world, from China, Korea, Japan, Middle East to Europe. It was cherished in the Chinese court, used in Japanese cha no yu tea ceremony, as well as used by commoners during the Edo period as depicted in ukiyo-e painting. This show will provide a chance to enjoy the diverse world of sometsuke in various sections featuring different countries, time-periods and communities.

Admiration for Sengai

Exhibitions

~2019.3

January 12 (Sat) – March 24 (Sun), 2019Sometsuke — The Flowering World of Blue and White Ceramics

Sometsuke or blue and white ware are ceramics on which underglaze designs are applied in blue, on white background. Together with the charm of the pure blue color, there is also a functional advantage in these ceramics where painting beneath the glaze makes it difficult for the design to come off. Having both top qualities of beauty and utility, sometsuke developed widely in many areas of the world, from China, Korea, Japan, Middle East to Europe. It was cherished in the Chinese court, used in Japanese cha no yu tea ceremony, as well as used by commoners during the Edo period as depicted in ukiyo-e painting. This show will provide a chance to enjoy the diverse world of sometsuke in various sections featuring different countries, time-periods and communities.

Sometsuke — The Flowering World of Blue and White Ceramics

2019.4~2020.3

April 6 (Sat) – June 9 (Sun), 2019Roku Koyō — Six Old Kilns, Ceramics of Japan

Medieval ceramics are simple and primitive, but also filled with dynamic and powerful qualities. Ceramics fired at the kilns of Seto, Tokoname, Echizen, Shigaraki, Tamba and Bizen, from the medieval to the present day, are called Roku Koyō. Literally meaning “six old kilns,” they have been popular ceramics among the Japanese. They were fired as essential daily items, but also came to attract the attention of the people as tea ceramics. Although receiving influence of foreign culture such as of the karamono (Chinese things), these ceramics have developed original styles of expression reflecting the traits of the regions. In this exhibition, together with karamono items of bronze ware and Chinese ceramics, we will show the appeal of Japanese medieval ceramics.

Roku Koyō -Six Old Kilns, Ceramics of Japan

June 22 (Sat) – August 25 (Sun), 2019Sancai, Three-color Glazed Ware — Treasures of the Silk Road

It was in the beginning of the 20th century that Tang three-color glazed (or Sancai) ware was discovered, and its existence revealed by coincidence during a railroad construction in China. The multi-colored ceramics elegantly decorated with green, amber and white (clear) glazes soon attracted the collectors around the world, and it came to represent Chinese ceramics. Sancai ware were burial goods of the Tang dynasty (618-907) emperors and aristocrats, but at the same time, they were artistic items that illustrated the exchange between the east and west along the Silk Road. In this exhibition, we will show the world of beauty that reflects the international features of the time period through sancai ware and related items.

Sancai, Three-color Glazed Ware -Treasures of the Silk Road

August 31 (Sat) – September 29 (Sun), 2019330 Years since Oku no Hosomichi, The Narrow Road to the Deep North
The World of Bashō

It was in late March of Genroku 2 (1689) that Matsuo Bashō (1644–94), haiku poet active in the first half of the Edo period, left Edo to the Dewa region of northern Japan, traveling around Matsushima and Hiraizumi. He then continued to travel through Echigo, Ecchū and Echizen, the coastal provinces of north-central Japan, reaching Mino-Ogaki in late August. It was in April of Genroku 7 (1694) that he compiled the travelogue, Oku no Hosomichi (or Narrow Road to the Deep North). The year 2019 marks the 330th anniversary of this journey. To commemorate this special year, we will show the art works related to the world of haiku, by displaying calligraphy and paintings of Bashō as well as of those who admired him.

330 Years since Oku no Hosomichi, The Narrow Road to the Deep North The World of Bashō

October 5 (Sat) – November 10 (Sun), 2019Admiration for Landscapes Meishō Hakkei, Eight Scenic Views

In the latter half of the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127), painter Song Di painted the changes of the Xiaoxiang region of Hunan province in eight poetic views. Called the “Eight Views of the Xiao and Xiang Rivers,” it became a representative theme of landscape paintings, and a source of inspiration of later masterpieces. It has been revered and received with affection in Japan as well. Beginning with the “Eight Views of the Xiao and Xiang Rivers,” this exhibition will feature other popular scenic landscapes, such as Xi Hu (or West Lake), that has been depicted in China and Japan since old days. We hope to show the world of landscapes cherished in the hearts of the people.

Admiration for Landscapes -Meishō Hakkei, Eight Scenic Views

November 23 (Sat), 2019 – February 2 (Sun), 2020
*Closed for year-end and New Year holidays (December 23 (Mon), 2019 - January 3 (Fri), 2020)
Introduction to Ceramics — Enjoying Color, Design and Form

Ceramic production in Japan began in the Jōmon period, going back some 16,000 years. Starting from this primitive pottery, Japanese ceramics developed by learning kiln production and glazing techniques introduced from China and Korea, continuing to receive strong influences in design and form. On the other hand, one can see a new stylistic esthetic created within the original Japanese culture, in vessels for tea ceremony, flower arrangement, and festivities in the later periods. The history of Japanese ceramics will be surveyed, hoping to introduce the evolution of the beauty captured in ceramics.

Introduction to Ceramics -Enjoying Color, Design and Form

February 11 (Tue) – March 22 (Sun), 2020Kanō School — The Eyes and Hands that Controlled the Painting World

Sometimes extravagant, but sometimes refined. It was the Kanō school artists that always played a leading role in the Muromachi to Edo period painting world, while responding to the commissions and the trend of the times. Learning from tradition of past artistic expressions, they were not only prominent artists, but also intellectuals well read in Japanese and Chinese painting history. This exhibition will show their gracious pieces together with works old and new which the Kanō artists must have come across, trying to approach the elements they saw and that supported their creative activity.

Kanō School -The Eyes and Hands that Controlled the Painting World
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